Watch, Read, Listen, Play - Connect

A media studies instructor and recent PhD candidate, I love media! I love pop culture! Welcome to this corner of the net where I blog the things I watch, read, listen, and play.

This is a short ethnographic documentary about crossplay produced for a class of completely non-videographer professionals. We wish we could have made it longer, but it was for a class, so restrictions meant making major cuts and leaving out a lot more to talk about cosplay and crossplay.  

subitoallegra:

prettygeekygirl:

Here is just a sample of some of my recent photo project, CONsent, which you can read about here.

Please read and spread the word around. I got to work with some great cosplayers, photographers and fans and I really hope to continue this project if it gains enough support. 

Thank you for looking!

I’ve actually had a lot of people approach me about Meagan Marie’s post and the CONsent movement to share my thoughts and experiences. Truth be told, it’s a little hard for me to discuss because I have baggage, but also because people have said so many wonderful things on the subject, so what do I have to add?

Here’s what I have to add: it’s not enough to just reblog a post. At the end of the day, it’s how you actually behave.

It’s really easy to say: “Oh, I support cosplayers and, you know, their right to not be harassed in any way,” but are you actually honoring your words? Are you actually doing something about it?

Or are you perpetuating it with innocently objectifying, racist, ableist, shapist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, or otherwise harmful comments—oh but they’re not hurtful because they’re harmless amirite?—or through inaction?

I said this a year ago: I am not cosplaying for you. Now let me add to that point with some more experience.

I am not your spank fantasy. I am not a saucy minx. I am not a slut, whore, or any other similar term you may use for me. I am not going to work it for the camera because you’re screaming for me to do so. I am not going to take pornographic images for your enjoyment. I am not a “fucking cunt” because I didn’t hear you catcall me. 

I am not puny. I am not too ugly to cosplay. I am not a dumb bitch for working off of a different reference image than the one you’re staring at. I am not going to listen to you repeatedly insult me to my friends while you completely demean my right to cosplay one of my favorite goddamn characters in media just because you think I’m not good enough.

I am not going to smile while you comment on my breasts as if I’m not standing right in front of you. I am not going to feel safe when police officers and security guards at convention centers stare at me like I’m a slab of meat. I am not going to feel comfortable while you comment on my mother’s body when I’m talking about making a dress for her, thank you, that’s really fucking classy bro.

I am not a dress-up doll. I am not your love interest. I am not going to reciprocate your affections—not when you try to force me to, anyway.

I wish I could say that I am not going to keep quiet anymore, but truthfully, I do. I try to smile through so much of it, ignore the comments that make me cringe, cry to myself when I can’t explain to people why someone is making me uncomfortable. I don’t speak up, because I try so hard to be the person that people find fun and likable, because I’ve been cast aside and bullied for saying stop, no, and leave me alone.

More than anything else, I’m failing myself for not standing up for myself.

I guess what I’m trying to say is that I want to see these movements actually work. I want to know that enforcers and convention staff will stop anyone who harasses us. I want people to shame the creeps. I want to feel safe to create and perform this art form, both online and in convention centers.

Except that takes action that’s far more active than reblogging a post, and self-awareness that allows us to ask ourselves: “Am I making this person feel uncomfortable?” We can make the cosplay community a safe and positive place, and while it starts with a like or reblog, our action has to continue.

(via captainallegra)

ze-tarts:

Done doing these so here they all are in one place! Fully Dressed Redesigns of Superheroines.

Point of this: An exercise in character design, attempting to clothe the heroines nearly all the way and not making them painted-on, while still keeping the look of their original costumes in some way.  Hopefully keeping them looking as iconic as the originally were. Just showing what can be done with a costume breaking outside the barrier of the norm.

NOT the point of this: some moral code I’m trying to push on you

Sorry if there was a character you wanted me to do that I didn’t get to!

(Source: supernormalstep, via yamino)

yamino:

Now I know why I’ve got these weird gender confusions, must be because I was reading the wrong stories as a child!  They should put a warning on these things! God forbid a girl starts reading tales of mystery, suspense, and adventure. Next thing, she’ll be getting ideas, and thinking…

yamino:

Now I know why I’ve got these weird gender confusions, must be because I was reading the wrong stories as a child!  They should put a warning on these things! God forbid a girl starts reading tales of mystery, suspense, and adventure. Next thing, she’ll be getting ideas, and thinking…

image

A Look at Costume Designs to Fully Clothe Some Comics Ladies

dcwomenkickingass:

I’ve received many, many, many notes asking my thoughts about the redesigns done by Michael Lee for several female comic characters. His pieces are the result of, as he says, 

An exercise in character design, attempting to clothe the heroines nearly all the way and not making them painted-on, while still keeping the look of their original costumes in some way.  Hopefully keeping them looking as iconic as the originally were. Just showing what can be done with a costume breaking outside the barrier of the norm.

He also notes that he’s not pushing a “moral code” with these designs.

The idea of redesigning costumes to reduce the amount of skin makes a lot of sense particularly with superheroes where exposed skin can mean an injury. And, of course, the fact that with the exception of the occassional costume, most male characters don’t flash much skin.

And they can give characters a new feel. For example, as of the best redesigns of any costume which also reduced exposed skin was done last year for DeConnick’s reboot of Carol Danvers into Captain Marvel. A year later and it already easily recognizable and makes the years that Marvel hung on to the old Ms. Marvel design seem silly. 

You may have seen these redesigns already as they have been all over the net and Tumblr. I saw them awhile ago and honestly? They didn’t all work for me. I certainly admire his effort and do like some of his work and would appreciate seeing less skin and “painted on” costumes. (Although I’m a firm believer that the costume isn’t always the problem). That said some of his elements - longer jackets and tunics, loose pants and color choices - didn’t appeal to me. You may, however, differ in view. And again, this was a great and appreciated effort. Here’s a look at each of the designs and my thoughts.image

I like idea of a suit but I’m not a lover of the long jacket and super wide pants. This would work better for me if the pants had about half the flare (or were tucked into boots) and the jacket was Tuxedo length. Love the pinstripes and the purple lining.

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dcwomenkickingass:

Wonder Women! Documentary to Air on PBS

The documentary Wonder Women! which looks at “the untold story of American Superheroines is finally coming to TV. The film, which has been playing a events around the country for the past year, will be shown beginning April 15. You can see a bit at the trailer above. This film was a labor of love for creator Kristy Guevara-Flanagan and many of you help fund it through Kickstarter. PBS recently aired a segment on Wonder Woman  in their Pioneers of Television series.